Alle häufig gestellten Fragen werden in der Zukunft hier eingestellt.

Tips & reminders on painting unconventional surfaces:

1. Chalk Paint® is amazing- but it is not a miracle. Be realistic in what you are painting. Decide if you are looking for a “season or a lifetime” and get feedback on if it will perform to your expectations.

 

2. Slippery surface? Chalk Paint® does not require stripping, sanding or priming, however, if you are covering something that is super, super slippery- it would not hurt to scuff it up with some rough sand paper. Again, Chalk Paint® is amazing- but it is not a miracle. I have people write me about painting wall tile. Annie’s does not promote that, but I have a customer’s who have and they are elated. I would clean them really well. Use a little Mineral Spirits on a ScotchBrite scrubbie. Clean and then rinse with plain ole’ water. Make sure to wait a day or two to allow any moisture in the grout to dry. Scuff them up with some 180 grit sand paper. Blow off dust.

Apply initial coat of Chalk Paint- thinning it just a little. WAIT 24 hours before applying a second coat. This allows the paint to “do it’s thing” – basically scientifically – to let the molecules settle, connect and really adhere to the surface. Once done- clear wax over your paint or lacquer.

 

3. Allow your base coat to dry 24 hours before applying another coat. I am incredibly impatient- but in general – just like I wrote above- the wait time allows the paint to “do it’s thing” – basically scientifically – to let the molecules settle, connect and really adhere to the surface.

 

4. If choosing to use Chalk Paint® outside, it needs to be on a surface that will not be saturated with water all of the time. Most products will fail in this environment.


Just received a great question from Joy Hall. (Hi Joy!!!)

Joy wrote me ~ I am going to start my first piece with Chalk Paint® Decorative Paint by Annie Sloan which has been painted with an olive green paint. The paint is somewhat peeling on places. Should I sand the paint off or is OK to just paint over it? Thanks for your help.

My response was~ You never need to sand for Chalk Paint™ to adhere- HOWEVER, if you have loose paint- you should sand to remove what is easily flaking off. (I often use the analogy that you never would want to build a house on quick sand) Chalk Paint® is incredible- but it is not a miracle. SO a solid foundation…or surface for this matter is important. That means dusting/cleaning your piece prior to painting (unless you want it to have extra texture), removing the rust or making it inert (unless you want the rust to bleed through) and removing loose chipped – peeling paint. And having texture or rust bleed through is not a bad thing at all- if you are going for that type of look!

However, if you do scuff up and sand chipping paint to remove it- afterward – make sure that the surface is smooth. Meaning not pitted (like a hole) from where the paint chipped off otherwise your new top coat of paint color will take on the profile of the piece and if it is pitted or has pockets where paint has peeled- that topography will show through the fresh paint. Again- Chalk Paint® is amazing- and sometimes you can apply it a little thicker to compensate for variations in the surface- but keep in mind- if you apply very thick you run the risk of it “Crackling” a bit during the drying process.

Another thing I would like to share – is that you may also want to shellac the whole surface once done spot sanding. IN FACT…9 times out of 10 – you probably should shellac after doing a partial sanding like shown in the image below of Adrienne who works at the shop with me.

We sanded the top of the dresser that had deep scratches and since both stained wood and bare wood were exposed – we used the shellac to create a barrier so that the paint went on without shadowing from the different surfaces shown. NOTE that when using shellac…it is important to shellac the whole surface and not just spot treat. Shellac is also important to use when you have used wood filler…shellac after the wood filler is dry to allow the paint to be applied without any variation from the different surfaces. Wood filler will take the paint differently then your finished piece will and you do not want to have to apply extra coats to cover any visual differences.

Another good question written in from Ashley Steenhoven was, “Do you shellac the whole thing or just where you put the filler?”

Again, my response is to never spot treat with shellac. Always do the whole side of whatever you are spraying as so you do not run the risk of either a surface line from just where the shellac perimeter is…or risk having discoloration due to just applying it in a small spot. Better to be safe than sorry. SO- as for the example in my photo- we would spray the whole top …but were careful when doing so not to over spray any other area of the dresser that we did not need to spray, meaning the sides or front. Again, since we only sanded the top, we did not spray the sides or front since it not necessary. Keep it simple and don’t make extra work for yourself- or use product that is not necessary since both equate to wasted time and wasted money. When I sprayed the top using the Zinsser Shellac can, I aimed the can from the center of the dresser top facing out to the sides as so to not get spray on the sides or front of the dresser. Does that make sense? (I probably should take a photo of me doing this- so you can see an image!!!!) And remember when working with spray shellac to always read the safety instructions on how to properly use any product.


How Long Should You Wait To Paint Over Freshly Waxed Pieces?

 

You painted and waxed a piece and now you have changed your mind and want to paint another Chalk Paint® color on it. How long should you wait before doing so? Can you do it the same day?

 

This situation happens to people and know that it is not a problem to paint Chalk Paint® over previously painted and waxed pieces.

 

The answer is a bit dependent on HOW THICK you applied your wax.  I say that because I have felt pieces others have done and the surface actually feels waxy to the touch.    

 

In general – after we remove the residual wax – our pieces feel dry where you can slide your hand across it.

 

With that said- in general…you should be able to paint over a waxed piece right away.  Could be same day.  Some painting techniques actually require that when building up layers.  

 

However, it is important to allow the soft wax to cure if your piece feels tacky. The amount of wax you have applied plays into how long you should wait.  Annie recommends waiting a week or two. BUT- if you only applied one coat of wax and it felt dry immediately- it should be okay to paint over it sooner.    (again- same day)

 

MINERAL SPIRITS:  A quick suggestion if wanting to paint over a waxed surface and you are concerned about the amount of wax.  Take some mineral spirits on a rag and wipe the wax off.  You should always be able to slide the TOP of your hand across your piece after applying and removing the wax.  Use the top of your hand though since it should be clean of wax- versus the palm of your hand or your finger tips – which may have some wax on it from applying it.

 

IF you applied too much wax – use a little mineral spirits on a rag.  I mean a little- it should be slightly damp- NOT dripping wet.  Be careful because you do not want this on your dripping on your brand new wood floor too!  So- place a drop cloth down if necessary.

 

Using your rag that is moist with Mineral Spirits- wipe your cabinets in the same direction you painted them from edge to edge.  Move across the cabinet and do not aggressively focus on one spot.  THE POINT here is to lift some of the wax- NOT all of it.

 

If you do take too much off- you can practice applying Clear Wax properly and add an additional fresh coat.  LOL!

 

I know this can difficult if you are not a patient person, like me. But you want the base to be solid so the soft wax needs curing time to become hard. (And if you apply your wax super thick- where your pieces feel waxy or your hand cannot “glide” across the surface once you are done applying and removing the wax- the the cure time will take longer.)

 

****If you follow the waxing instructions that The Purple Painted Lady includes with all sales of wax – the wax will be dry and smooth immediately after removal. 

 

IF YOU ARE INPATIENT AND WANT TO PAINT OVER IT ASAP and the wax is fresh or tacky, then…:

 

You will want to use a little mineral spirits on a rag. Your rag should be slightly damp- NOT dripping wet. Be careful if doing this inside your home because you do not want Mineral Spirits dripping on your brand new wood floor. (well, you might not have a brand new floor, but you understand what I mean, right?)

 

So- place a drop cloth down if necessary. Using your rag that is moist with mineral spirits- wipe your piece in the same direction you painted it from edge to edge. Move across the cabinet, dresser, etc and do not aggressively focus on one spot. This process will take about 5 or 10 minutes to do your whole piece. You will need to have a few rags for this. The result you will be left with …..is that your Chalk Paint® will feel like it did prior to waxing. Sort of a flat, matte surface. Use your hand and glide it over the surface. By the feel of it- you should have a good idea- if you removed it all or at least most of it (which is ok too!)

 

Once done with removing the wax …….¸¸.•*¨¨*• …go ahead and paint with EITHER Chalk Paint® or any other paint product you choose.

 

DON’T TOUCH UP PAINT AFTER YOU HAVE APPLIED WAX:

 

Remember also- if you realize you missed a spot while painting after you have finished waxing, if you attempt to “spot fix” this missing paint  – in certain light you will see the “correction.” I once did this on top of a dresser.  I painted it in Coco and then waxed…like I always do. But then- I saw a spot that needed a “touch up” of paint.  So, I did the little touch up after I had finished waxing.  The little “touch up’s” I did were so visible- I had to repaint the whole top.

 

 

I use the analogy- that a touch up looks like to me- taking photographs and multiple panes of window glass.  Imagine a coffee table that has 5 panes of glass on top of it.  And you place one photo in each pane in a different area.  Then- once done you look down at the glass table top.  You know how – visually your eye will pick up on the different depths of those photos?  Doing a touch up after waxing, and then re-waxing creates that SAME EFFECT!

 

A friend of mine named Peggy Elwood asked another question related to fresh wax – “How long do you wait after waxing before selling a piece?”

My response was that on custom jobs I do- I will often wait a couple days before delivering it and furniture is always accompanied with a “Care Tag” explaining the cure time and how to take care of the painted piece going forward. No more Pledge or Endust allowed in the house! LOL! Customers can use their painted piece – but need to be more careful during that first month. I recommend that anything that has substantial weight to it- as in more than 5 pounds, should wait till after the “rule of thumb” 30 day cure time is over. (I personally find in upstate NY that my wax is quite hard sooner than that.) Also, lamps that have metal pointed feet as a base, can possibly leave an indention in the wax- so just be cautious. This can really depend on where in the country you live and the temperatures you are experiencing. A dry climate will allow the wax to cure faster- where a wet climate will cause the paint to take longer to dry and the wax longer to cure.

I have other helpful information located on my Facebook page HERE in case you would like to check them out. Please feel free to “PIN” my photo to your Chalk Paint® Pinterest board.

If you are interested in staying touch with The Purple Painted Lady- visit our Facebook page HERE – we would LOVE to hear from you and see your before & after photos!


Do Your Kitchen Cabinets Look Tired?

 

Do your cabinets look tired?
OR, are you tired of your cabinets?

 

The easy, affordable and beautiful solution is to paint them using Chalk Paint decorative paint by Annie Sloan…the “No Stripping, No Sanding, No Priming” “World’s Best Paint!”
PicMonkey Collage The Purple Painted Lady Painted Caninets susan Old White

 

If interested in painting your cabinets but are afraid to- please don’t be. All of us at The Purple Painted Lady are here to help you through your project.

 

Check out the amazing transformation that my customer Marian Harrison completed in her kitchen. Between the two Before & After photos, nothing changed, other than the cabinets were painted and waxed.

 

Slide1

 

purple painted lady chalk paint

 

And that old bathroom vanity? Freshen it up!

 

The Purple Painted Lady Vanity Before & after Chalk Paint PicMonkey Collage

 

Amazing transformation, yes? I think so!

 

Many customers want to paint their kitchens but have questions, such as:

 

* What prep is there when painting a kitchen?

ANSWER: Before painting, it is necessary to clean your cabinets. When you cook, fry, broil or boil whatever you are making, even with a fan- steam goes into the air. It eventually settles on your cabinets. If you have children or a dog, who knows what else might be stuck to them. Get some Odorless Mineral Spirits and wipe down the cabinets using a rag or even a ScotchBrite Scrubbie. Note that the image of the Mineral Spirits shows different packaging that is available. The key thing here is to purchase the regular Odorless Mineral Spirits. NOT the environmentally green Mineral Spirits which is shown in the white packaging in the right of the photo. Mineral Spirits The Purple Painted Lady - Green vs Odorless regular

 

* Will the Chalk Paint adhere to the sides of my cabinets, they are made of a laminate material?
ANSWER: YES! You do not need to do any additional prep- but if you feel more comfortable doing a light sanding using 200 grit sandpaper- you can. I however, have painted many laminated cabinets and have never sanded them.

 

Painted Kitchen Cabinets Courtney Crabb MY CUSTOMER The Purple Painted Lady

 

* I have old cabinets and the protective top coat is worn, especially around the hardware. Is there anything I should do?
ANSWER: YES! You will most likely need to apply shellac to your doors. Shellac is a “sealer.” that means it seals in the surface – preventing stain or wood tannins from bleeding through to the paint.

 

We prefer the clear Zinsser shellac. Again, note that shellac is a sealer so it will seal the surface preventing stain or wood tannins from bleeding through your new paint. I recommend getting the quart of shellac and using a rag, wipe down all the doors and the cabinet frame just like you would wipe down your kitchen table when you clean it. You want the rag moist but not dripping. I cover the whole cabinet in a linear fashion, making sure to NOT miss any spot and to catch the edges also!

 

Kitchen Cabinet Stephanie Kapral MY CUSTOMER The Purple Painted Lady Chalk Paint

 

Spraying the shellac using an aerosol can is also an option. I have done this many times. On a small job this is good, but remember to spray 2 coats. Aerosol cans of shellac will cost more than buying the quart, so for large jobs- I recommend the quart.
Kitchen Cabinets shellac Zinsser

 

Zinsser shellac comes in quarts and aerosol containers. If you have a well ventilated space and take your doors down- you can use the spray, but I feel the quart and a rag will give you better coverage. I usually will do 2 coats.

 

If you already started painting and did not shellac prior, and then realize that you are getting bleeding- you can still apply the shellac. Just allow the paint to dry thoroughly and then apply the shellac. when to use shellac on kitchen cabinets bleed tannin

 

* Do I have to take the doors off to paint using Chalk Paint?

 

ANSWER: NO…you can leave the doors hinged and on the cabinets when painting. Many do this! However, when I am painting a kitchen- I typically take the doors off and will number them. I then lay them down flat and process them a bit like a production line. If you choose to paint them while they are hanging and plan on painting the hinges, just lightly dry brush the hinges so they are not “caked” with paint.
Raw Cabinets

 

* How do I calculate how much paint I need?

 

ANSWER: I will take a piece of paper and make a drawing of the kitchen layout. Literally drawing out the each section of cabinets. I then note the height, width and depth of the cabinets. You need these measurements in order to determine the square footage.

 

Calculating the square footage is very easy. For each section, multiply the height times the width. The result is your square footage for that section.

 

Once you have this initial number- understand that this would be for only one coat of paint. A typical kitchen project will take 2 coats. Sometimes, even 3 coats of paint depending on the color you select and the color of your cabinets.

 

Because you will probably need 2 coats of paint- you will need to double your square footage in the end. Also- don’t forget to paint the underside of your top cabinets. This is the part that is directly over your counter top. And- are you planning on painting the inside of the door? If yes, (and most do) account for that in your total.

 

A quart of Chalk Paint® will roughly cover about 150 square feet. So take your total amount of square footage and divide by 150. The number from this calculation will be how many quarts of paint you need. And always error on the side of an additional quart so you have enough for your project.
Old Ochre Cabinet with name

 

* I want durability- will this paint work?

 

ANSWER: Yes! Chalk Paint® is extremely durable and when you finish the paint with the wax- it becomes even harder. Something I suggest to my “kitchen Cabinet” painting customers is to apply a uniform – thin even coat of paint and then wait 24 hours before painting the second coat. There is a lot of science that goes into paint products in general. In the first 24 hours- the paint will really bear down and tighten its grip to the surface. I was once told to think of the paint molecules as floating around with space between them, then as it dries over that first 24 hours- the space between them gets smaller and the paint gets tighter against the surface. Allow science to do its thing and for the first coat of paint to have 24 hours.

 

* What is the process when it comes to painting cabinets using Chalk Paint®?

 

ANSWER: If you are looking for texture, use the Chalk Paint® directly from the quart in the consistency it is made in. However, if you are looking for a more traditional smooth finish, consider applying your first coat directly from the quart. Once the first coat is dry, pour some of your Chalk Paint® into another container and add some water to thin it. I would say add about 10 to 15% water in comparison to your paint. Use a cheap measuring cup so you can easily reproduce this thinned mixture. Apply your second coat of pant with this thinned Chalk Paint®. This will allow to get a smoother finish and it will even stretch your paint a bit.
The Purple Painted Lady apply chalk paint thinned with water to cabinets during second coat kitchen bathroom

 

* Can I paint the cabinets outside in my garage?

 

ANSWER: Maybe! You should only paint pieces, cabinets or any furniture for that matter if it is at room temperature consistently. The same goes for all of your paint products. Never let them freeze or sit in a 100 degree garage. Temperature will effect your products. This recommendation applies to even while they are drying, curing and the time in between!

 

A space heater is not adequate and definitely not sufficient if only being used while you are in the workspace.

 

The best thing to do – is set up a painting area in the house where you know the temperatures will be within normal range consistently and that there will not be any excessive dust.

 

* Should I paint the inside of the cabinets?

 

The answer to that is really totally up to you. I always paint the back of the door, but not always do we paint inside the cabinet box. It will add more time and cost to the project and many people are fine with leaving them as is…so consider what is best for you. Consider though when it comes to the resale of your home- having the inside of your cabinets finished nicely is a plus!

 

* What type of brush should I use?

 

We recommend using a natural bristle brush. Annie Sloan has amazing brushes available-but I still like to use a 1.5 inch Purdy brush that has an angled brush. These are very nice if you are “cutting” an edge.

 

* How many coats of wax do you recommend?

 

I always apply two coats of wax on cabinets that I am doing. Three if I need to add a dark wax glaze.

 

Here is some additional high level information / steps to reference if planning on doing your kitchen.

 

Lastly- please consider using The Purple Painted Lady if needing to purchase your chalk paint on-line.

 

Thanks,
Trish
Kitchen Cab ReFAB workshop Facebook 2014

 

The Purple Painted Lady Kitchen BEFORE AFTER SUsan Old White 1

The Purple Painted Lady Kitchen BEFORE AFTER SUsan Old White 2
The Purple Painted Lady Kitchen BEFORE AFTER SUsan Old White 3


Painting A Linoleum Floor and …..

Painting Stairs, Floors, and Linoleum with Chalk Paint®.

When it comes to linoleum, although some of you have the awesome ability to tear tile out and gut a bath, there are many of us – who sadly, are just not as talented as you. That- or some of us- just want a quick fix to change the look of what we have till maybe we budget for someone else to come an do the job, correctly.

An example of changing the look of something you have in your home via an untraditional way- is painting it. Specifically, paining old linoleum flooring.

Painted Linoleum Floor bathroom Annie Laquer The Purple Painted Lady Chalk Paint

The Purple Painted Lady was impress by the amazing job Cindy did!

Here is what she shared, “First, I cleaned the floor well with non-phosphate TSP but I have since heard it can take up to days to completely dry but that’s usually with furniture. (Some now some are using Simple Green.)

Most important, The Purple Painted Lady wants to add regarding cleaning: **Make sure to thoroughly rinse the floor after cleaning with any product though! Any residual cleaning agent will cause the paint to NOT adhere.

Next, Cindy put on 1 coat of the Old White straight from the quart. I recommend giving this first coat 24 hours to really set up before doing your next step.

Then she mixed 1 part Old White to 3 parts Coco for the stenciling project. She purchased a spray adhesive specifically for stencils, I think off Amazon. (she sprayed it on stencil outside; so it was easy to lift up and move to another area without leaving any residue and could move several times before having to spray again.)

She then put on 2 coats of Annie Sloan’s Lacquer (non-yellowing). It is important to always use 2 thin coats and apply with a foam/ sponge roller.

Annie’s Lacquer is meant for high traffic areas and is water repellant, but not water proof. That means if you have water sitting on it for long periods of time, it can effect it. Annie Sloan Lacquer is a clear matte water based varnish for painted floors or heavily used furniture items, particularly for those painted with Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan (as in Cindy’s case). It is a strong penetrating Lacquer meant to be used over wood or concrete floors painted with Chalk Paint® that are interior floors only. This Lacquer is NOT intended to be used outside. Again, this is for INSIDE use only. Note- this is not recommended for outdoor use.

Whether the paint is applied as a wash or applied solidly with a foam roller, this robust Lacquer will seal it perfectly. It dries quickly – but allow your floor or furniture piece to cure overnight. It will slightly darken the color beneath it with a matte finish that has a slight sheen to give it strength.

Often customers will state after the first coat they see some slight lines in the Lacquer if using a roller, but after the second coat is applied- it looks wonderful. (just sharing this so you do not panic)

There is no need to sand in between either! The Lacquer will slightly darken the paint beneath it. Something to keep in mind…is that Graphite (and dark Chalk Paint® colors) are notorious tattle talers! Meaning if the Lacquer is too thick- it will appear to be streaky or cloudy. It is the flattening agents in the Lacquer that give it its matte sheen create a cloudy or milky effect when the Lacquer is applied too thickly and this is more noticeable over darker colors. I hate to write this- but often repainting and then thinner layers of Lacquer applied with a sponge roller or brush is the correction. So, since you are reading this- I would hope that you would not apply it too thick.
Lacquer

Applying Lacquer:

Some people will sometimes take a wide sponge brush or bristle brush to even out the rolled out Lacquer immediately after rolling it – as so to make sure it is thinned enough. Also- it is important – to make sure that the Lacquer was incorporated well before using it. Again- this is done either by stirring- or- tipping it upside down and rolling the container in your hands.

The varnish is quick drying, non-toxic, low odor, and non-yellowing. The Lacquer will give you a very durable scuff resistant finish. Note though, it is not recommended in areas where there will be a lot of water. Annie’s Lacquer is ring resistant- meaning it can tolerate hot cups. It is also resistant to alcohol spills, which if using wax as a top coat- is not.

The liter will cover approximately 107 square feet (depending on how porous the surface and how thickly the Lacquer is applied.) Two coats are recommended for areas of high traffic (never substitute one thick coat if in a hurry- it will not dry uniformly and you will just have issues- this rule applies to paint and for that matter – ANY product on the market!) I applied it on the top of a heavily used dresser and it was dry to the touch within minutes!

 

DIRECTIONS:

Add about 10% water into the first coat.

Let dry 2 hours and recoat with full strength Lacquer (still a thin coat).

Let dry overnight.

Moving Furniture Over A Floor With Lacquer:

Lacquer dries quickly – but again, allow your floor or furniture piece to cure overnight. It will slightly darken the color beneath it with a matte finish that has a slight sheen to give it strength.  If using on your floor, do not start “dragging” pieces of furniture across it.  In fact, for a period of time- have someone help you and lift and carry pieces to place them.

Often customers will state after the first coat they see some slight lines in the Lacquer if using a roller, but after the second coat is applied- it looks wonderful. (just sharing this so you do not panic) No need to sand in between either!

Cannot stress this enough…..Something to understand when using Lacquer is that it does not want to be back stroked.

Confident strokes in one direction for an even sheen is extremely important because varnishes do not like to be back brushed. This can cause flashing…meaning an uneven finish.

The Lacquer will slightly darken the paint beneath it. Something to keep in mind…is that Graphite (and dark Chalk Paint® colors) are notorious tattle talers! Meaning if the Lacquer is too thick- it will appear to be streaky or cloudy. The flattening agents in the Lacquer that give it its matte sheen create a cloudy or milky effect when the Lacquer is applied too thickly and this is more noticeable over darker colors. I hate to write this- but often repainting and then thinner layers of Lacquer applied with a sponge roller or brush is the correction. So, since you are reading this- I would hope that you would not apply it too thick!

Some people will sometimes take a wide sponge brush or bristle brush to even out the rolled out Lacquer immediately after rolling it – as so to make sure it is thinned enough. Keep in mind the comment above about stroking it too much! Also- it is important – to make sure that the Lacquer was incorporated well before using it. Again- this is done either by stirring- or- tipping it upside down and rolling the container in your hands.

The varnish is quick drying, non-toxic, low odor, and non-yellowing. The Lacquer will give you a very durable scuff resistant finish. Note though, it is not recommended in areas where there will be a lot of water. Annie’s Lacquer is ring resistant- meaning it can tolerate hot cups. It is also resistant to alcohol spills, which if using wax as a top coat- is not.

If the floors are oak or some other sort of open grain wood- note that in the drying action of the Lacquer- it could pull up tannins through the new paint layers. Annie Sloan Lacquer is a penetrating varnish, meaning that it gets its strength by penetrating through the paint layers and attaching itself to the substrate. As it dries, the water in the varnish evaporates and the remaining materials shrink or pull tight to the surface, again another reason for its great strength.

However, the varnish pulls from both directions (think about how clothes shrink- in all directions) and this action can pull the tannins up if they have not been sealed with shellac prior to painting.

The same problem would occur if the floors had been previously stained with a non-colorfast stain. The only solution is to shellac, repaint, and reseal.

NOTE- Lacquer does NOT adhere over oil-based products.

Annie Sloan Lacquer dries to a matte sheen with just a hint of shine for durability … it is not glossy. Annie Sloan Lacquer can also be sprayed, but most apply with a sponge roller or a “bouncy” bristle brush.

Again, with most spray systems it will most likely need to be diluted with some water. My experience with working with the Lacquer has shown that the sheen level diminishes a bit with the addition of water … the more water added the more matte it becomes. With either product, try not to exceed adding more than 20% water.

****   If you brush it on – have confident strokes- since Lacquer does not like being over played with.

The liter will cover approximately 107 square feet (depending on how porous the surface and how thickly the Lacquer is applied.) Two coats are recommended for areas of high traffic (never substitute one thick coat if in a hurry- it will not dry uniformly and you will just have issues- this rule applies to paint and for that matter – ANY product on the market!) I applied it on the top of a heavily used dresser and it was dry to the touch within minutes!

How To Use:

Before use, turn the container upside down for about 1 to 2 hours since all the “good materials” that may have sunk to the bottom get well incorporated again to the top and is well dispersed.

DO NOT SHAKE since this will cause bubbles to form in the varnish which you do not want to happen! It is best to gently mix the Lacquer by rolling the containers around in your hands or pouring the contents into a bucket to stir.

Apply the Lacquer with a high quality sponge/foam roller and using a sponge brush to cut in at the edges.

Apply two THIN coats for areas of high traffic such as a hallway, stairs, or sitting room but only one for a bedroom for instance. Again- it is best to apply two thin coats rather than one thicker one. You never get a head taking shortcuts!

An average coating needs to dry 1- 2 hours before another coat can be applied. Leave it overnight to “cure” before walking on it. Wash brushes/sponge rollers thoroughly in water.

Note that Annie Lacquer is NEVER applied over waxes! However, you can apply Annie Sloan’s soft waxes over the Lacquer.


WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO MIX MISS MUSTARD SEED’S MILK PAINT?

There are many ways to mix the milk paint, we offer guidelines on how to mix it and what consistency to look for, however we encourage to always test out a small amount to make sure that you are happy with the mixture. Milk Paint can be a stain or a solid opaque paint depending on how much water you add.

For a solid opaque look: Mix one part water to one part Milk Paint powder. Add water to container/jar first, then add powder and mix with a whisk, electric milk frother or blender. For a super smooth finish,use a blender for best results, otherwise mix with a frother or a whisk for an additional 1-2 minutes for a super fine mix. Mixed Milk Paint should have a table cream consistency for opaque coverage. Once satisfied with consistency, test out a small sample to see if desired consistency is reached. If the brush drags, the mixture is too thick (opaque) and you need to add more water.  If sample drips and is too thin (transparent), then add more powder. Adjust as required, and start painting!

Note: Mixing Milk Paint can be like baking bread and the amount of water required will vary based on the humidity of the day and location.  It can also vary depending on the amount of pigment in the color being mixed.

Watch this video if you’re new to mixing milk paint!


WHEN SHOULD I USE BONDING AGENT?

When the surface is previously finished, painted with a non-porous paint or sealed. Milk paint will resist and chip if it cannot be absorbed, as it is in porous surfaces and raw wood. The ratios of bonding agent can be adjusted depending on the amount of seal or shine on the piece being painted. Do not use the bonding agent or use it in select areas if a “chippy” look is desired.  Remember that painting a pre-finished without sanding and/or using the Bonding Agent is unpredictable!

…and a video tutorial…


WHEN SHOULD I USE HEMP OIL INSTEAD OF WAX?

As stated above, Hemp Oil is 100% natural,so it’s the ideal finish for customers who love and use Milk Paint because it’s all natural.  It’s a food safe finish that can be used on cutting boards, butcher blog counters and kitchen tables.  Hemp Oil is also great for projects that will be used outside. Once it cures (after approximately 30 days), it protects and wears beautifully in the elements. Wax will break down and emulsify in the heat. We do not recommend waxing pieces that will be in the heat, sun or rain.

For an extra durable interior top coat, apply a coat of Hemp Oil and let dry (12 – 24 hours), then apply wax on top. Remember wax over oil, never oil over wax!


WHEN SHOULD I USE TOUGH COAT INSTEAD OF WAX OR HEMP OIL?

We advise our Miss Mustard Seed’s Tough Coat for high-traffic areas. It’s very durable and water-resistant.

Kitchen cabinets are a good example … they endure a lot of wear and tear, water, grease, stains. Wax and hemp oil have great protective qualities, but both will only endure a lot of water or aggressive household products for only a short amount of time. The more you clean or scrub your cabinets, the faster the wax or hemp oil will wear, dry out and will have to be reapplied.